Tagged: how to look after mixed race hair

How to Wash Your Cornrows or Ghana Braids (Especially After Working Out)

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Right now, I’m positively obsessed with cornrows and it seems the natural hair world is too.

Long, short… it doesn’t matter- I just adore them!

In fact, I’ve created an entire hair calendar around cornrow styles that I want to rock in 2017 (the obsession is real!)

However, one of the down-sides to cornrows is that they can be a pain to wash especially if you’re like me and you love keeping your hair clean.

There’s nothing more annoying to me than having an itchy scalp that’s covered in icky dirt and build-up; ewww!

I personally have found that build-up and itching is much worse after a workout, especially after any form of cardio.

So, how do you keep your hair clean when it’s in a cornrowed or braided style?

Here is the simple yet effective routine that I recently used and it worked a treat.

  1. Dilute sulphate-free shampoo and water. Ideally poor this mix into a spray bottle and make sure you have twice the amount of water as you do shampoo. A little shampoo goes a long way. Then shake the bottle like there’s no tomorrow.
  2. Spray the mixture onto the parted sections of your cornrows (e.g. your scalp). Don’t apply it to the braided parts of your hair.
  3. Rinse your scalp and then repeat the process but with a conditioner/water combo.
  4. Rinse your scalp again, let it dry a little and then apply a light natural carrier oil like jojoba to your scalp.

If you really want to soothe your scalp and keep it clean, try adding a drop of peppermint or tea tree oil to the carrier oil as both ingredients have anti-bacterial properties and will keep your scalp moisturised and clean.

They’ll also make your scalp feel COOL and tingly, getting rid of any itchiness in the process.

So there you have it, my quick yet super effective method for getting rid of build-up when your hair is braided or cornrowed.

If you liked this post, put a smile on my face by sharing it on social and use the hashtag #mycurlsuk so we can find you and retweet you too!

With love,

Vicky x

Founder, MyCurls.co.uk

How To Look After Kids Mixed Race Hair

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering how to look after your child’s mixed hair, this article was written for you!

mixed race hair

The first thing to note is that mixed race hair is diverse- some mixed people have hair that is bone straight whilst others have hair that is tightly coiled or afro textured (think Lenny Kravitz).

It’s therefore important to know and understand your child’s hair so that you can determine the type of hair care regimen they need. There are lots of things to take into consideration when dealing with mixed race hair and sometimes the information can be a little bit overwhelming. To build the right knowledge and know-how, follow these simple steps.

Step 1.

Familiarise yourself. In other words, take the time to really feel, touch and understand your child’s hair so that you’ll know what it likes and what it doesn’t like. For instance, does it tangle easily? Does it get super knotty when shampooed? Does it shrink after being washed? Does it love being conditioned? The more you know about your child’s hair the better equipped you’ll be to look after it.

Step 2.

Avoid over-shampooing. If you’re a white mum with a mixed race/bi-racial child, you might be used to washing your own hair several times a week. That’s of course very normal because straighter hair textures need to be shampooed more frequently. However, most mixed race hair textures are different and can for the most part take on the characteristics of curly/afro hair. As a rule of thumb, the curlier your child’s hair is, the less often it needs to be shampooed.

The reason being that the body’s natural oils (called sebum) can’t pass down your child’s hair easily because their hair is curly. In comparison, with straight hair, it’s easy for the oils to come down the hair strands because they only have to flow downwards. However, because mixed race hair is often non-straight, the body’s oils can’t travel down. This means that your child’s hair is likely to get dry and can be prone to breakage if not managed properly. If you over shampoo your little one’s hair it will cause it to become incredibly dry which in turn leads to breakage. This leads me to my next point…

Step 3.

Moisturise. Moisturising simply refers to the products and techniques you use to stop your child’s hair from becoming dry. Thing of moisture as being the opposite of dryness. To moisturise mixed race hair it’s important to condition often (ideally one ever 2-3 days or so). Conditioning is vital for strengthening your child’s hair, preventing breakage and replacing moisture loss. If possible, always opt for a silicone free conditioner (most high street conditioners contain silicones that potentially damage the hair so it’s important to read the labels of bottles and know what’s in the products you’re using).

The second step to keeping your child’s hair moisturised is to apply a lotion or cream to their hair on a daily basis. Once again avoid lotions that contain harsh ingredients or damaging chemicals. Because we understand that it’s important to use the best hair products on your child’s hair, we don’t use harsh chemicals or silicones in any of our hair products. Furthermore, all of our products are paraben free!

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